Life is a gift. Keep playing.


Here at ThirtyFiveSixtyFour we absolutely believe that age is just a number. Sure, there are things we did at 16, 25, even 35 that are harder now that we’re 50, 55, 60. But that doesn’t mean we stop. I just listened to the raw recording of our latest podcast episode with Curtis Thompson. His conversation with Karen Stones was a great reminder that age is just a number and we shouldn’t let our age dictate our dreams. Age gives us wisdom. It teaches us that life is a gift.

Keep playing till the whistle

None of us know how much time we have left, but it doesn’t matter. Don’t watch the clock. Play to the last whistle. You can sit on the couch pressing the buttons on the remote or you can pursue a dream or a passion. Either way, in 12 months, a year will have passed.  Curtis retired from a successful career in law enforcement which gave him the means to raise his children. During this time, he continued to pursue his passion for music. When he retired, Curtis realized
that the final whistle had not been blown, but that the fourth quarter had just started. So, he and his wife began devoting more time to their music and launched Vancurt Music. And even though he still doesn’t know when that whistle will blow, it doesn’t matter. He’s fulfilling his musical calling.

Let’s address regrets. When asked if he has any regrets about something in his past, Curtis said no.  I’ve known Curtis for a minute and his answer surprised me. Everyone has regrets. But then he explained why he said no. Regrets waste your time and energy. When you spend your time regretting things you’ve done or not done in your past, you’re missing the chance to live your life now.  Having regrets means you are focusing on the past. Focusing on the past keeps you from living in the present. So, it’s time for me to change my perspective.  How about you? Look at your experiences as life tuition you paid toward your present. Live with no regrets.

Regrets are futile

Let’s address regrets. When asked if he has any regrets about something in his past, Curtis said no.  I’ve known Curtis for a minute and his answer surprised me. Everyone has regrets. But then he explained why he said no. Regrets waste your time and energy. When you spend your time regretting things you’ve done or not done in your past, you’re missing the chance to live your life now.  Having regrets means you are focusing on the past. Focusing on the past keeps you from living in the present. So, it’s time for me to change my perspective.  How about you? Look at your experiences as life tuition you paid toward your present. Live with no regrets.

Know your worth

Learn to be comfortable in your own skin. Learn to accept yourself. Act with good intentions. Don’t listen to the lie that you’re too old to do something – unless it’s a lie that says you can make an NBA team when you can’t even sink a layup. If you have a dream and the ability, like Curtis and his music, don’t be afraid to pursue it no matter your age. If someone tells you you’re too old (or even too young), not this or too much that, don’t believe them.  Be content with who you are. Don’t worry if others like you, as long as you like yourself.

Accept yourself

Simon Sinek, a trusted motivational speaker, urges us to look at the why.  When you’re struggling with loving yourself, ask yourself “Why?” “Why do I feel this way?” What are you seeking, what did you miss, what past trauma contributed to you feeling this way? Do the hard work of asking “Why do I feel this way? What is the unfulfilled need and why do I have it?”  If the hard work means therapy, then do it. Therapy is not a sign of weakness. It’s an acknowledgement that you need help moving on. It’s a brave step.  It helps you do the work to become a better you.  

Live in the present

Death is undefeated. That’s not a morbid statement. It’s recognizing that we all die and when we realize that, we realize that every day is a gift.  So, let’s live and enjoy every day we have. Even if it’s not your favorite day, if you remember that today is a gift, it’s easier to live in the present and enjoy the now. You can do this by being grateful for what you have.  Most of us are dealing with first world problems. We all have so much stuff. We accumulate it while we’re alive. But there’s no U-Haul to the afterlife – you can’t take your bass, your shoe collection, your SUV with you to the afterlife. So if you’re always chasing the future for that next bigger and better thing, you’re missing out on the joy that’s present in your life right now.

Live in the present and be grateful for what you have is a common theme among our guests, who by the way don’t know each other. Both Tiffany Wilson and Kevin Headley also mentioned this same concept in different contexts in their ThirtyFiveSixtyFour podcast episodes.

Serve others

We’re constantly bombarded with messages that define wealth as the accumulation of things. However, our pursuit of things can make us feel separate and lonely. Serving others can help you feel more connected and that will add value to your life. But if you reframe wealth as something gained through the serving of others, by adding value to their lives, you will then be wealthier than you could ever imagine. Even if you’re being generous as a way to make yourself feel better, it’s still all good.  When you set out to serve one person both you and that individual reap the benefits. So, the encouragement here is to do good and then watch good be done.

Hear all the goodness

Listen to Curtis’s podcast episode, “Life is a gift. Keep playing” as he and host Karen Stones talk about these topics in more detail. It’s a enlightening discussion that will leave you wanting to hear more.

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  • Mary Cook

    Mary Cook, also known as “MC” and “Mother Mary,” is heralded as one of the world’s few content whisperers. She is the creative force and Marcom Director at ThirtyFiveSixtyFour. Armed with a degree in English from UCLA, Mary is not just your average wordsmith—she’s a grammar nerd with a penchant for storytelling that captivates and resonates.

    Born into a big, close-knit family with seven siblings, Mary is committed to keeping family connections and gatherings alive with boisterous fun and games. Mary brings a lot of energy to everything she does. She’s as dedicated to her role as Marcom Director as she is to her role as favorite auntie to her 22 crazy, loving nieces and nephews.

    A life-long athlete, Mary’s passion for sports has transformed into a love for the adrenaline rush. When she’s not weaving words for our podcasts, you’ll find her carving waves on a jet ski or navigating desert trails in her RZR. Mary’s adventurous spirit is as diverse as her ability to craft compelling narratives for our audience.

    In a world that often craves attention, Mary thrives behind the scenes. Her meticulous attention to detail and commitment to excellence are the driving forces that elevate our Marcom strategy. As the wordsmith-in-chief, Mary ensures that every piece of communication reflects the essence of ThirtyFiveSixtyFour.

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About the Author

Mary Cook, also known as “MC” and “Mother Mary,” is heralded as one of the world’s few content whisperers. She is the creative force and Marcom Director at ThirtyFiveSixtyFour. Armed with a degree in English from UCLA, Mary is not just your average wordsmith—she’s a grammar nerd with a penchant for storytelling that captivates and resonates.

Born into a big, close-knit family with seven siblings, Mary is committed to keeping family connections and gatherings alive with boisterous fun and games. Mary brings a lot of energy to everything she does. She’s as dedicated to her role as Marcom Director as she is to her role as favorite auntie to her 22 crazy, loving nieces and nephews.

A life-long athlete, Mary’s passion for sports has transformed into a love for the adrenaline rush. When she’s not weaving words for our podcasts, you’ll find her carving waves on a jet ski or navigating desert trails in her RZR. Mary’s adventurous spirit is as diverse as her ability to craft compelling narratives for our audience.

In a world that often craves attention, Mary thrives behind the scenes. Her meticulous attention to detail and commitment to excellence are the driving forces that elevate our Marcom strategy. As the wordsmith-in-chief, Mary ensures that every piece of communication reflects the essence of ThirtyFiveSixtyFour.